Story

A bright future often lies beyond the glare of present problems. How true these words were for Charles Fenn Pretty. When he left Ontario in 1870, he had 18 cents in his pocket and a dream. And little did he realize the wealth and adventure that lay before him. As a man with a vision, he began his journey with dedication and hard work. His vision was to build a legacy. A legacy that is still with us today in beautiful British Columbia. Through perseverance and devotion, among other things he built up 340 acres of forested land west of the Chehalis reserve and thus began the Pretty family voyage of a lifetime.

The Harrison River Valley has a rich and remarkable history with the first indigenous peoples of this region. This history has soaked into the hearts of the rivers, streams and waterways that supported three First Nation bands, namely the Scowlitz, the Chehalis and the Douglas. At the time, the people of the First Nations decided to take advantage of the new work opportunities created by the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1800’s. Harrisonmouth, now known as Harrison Mills, was the transfer point for the gold miners their gear and the goods that came along with them. The First Nations bands were often in demand as pilots and boatmen.

They were also an integral part of the Pretty family history providing the Prettys with fish in abundance which supported the family’s canning factory, while at the same time providing the First Nations people with much-needed financial support.

Charlie’s great grandson Chris, true to family tradition, found another treat from Harrison Mills to share with the world. A fresh, clean mountain spring bubbling up nature’s purest form of water. The spring flows into Echo and Elbow Creeks, which lead to the Harrison River and then on to the mighty Fraser River. Unspoiled and free from pollutants, Christopher’s Spring Water has just the right blend of natural minerals to nourish the body, giving it what it needs to help you get the most out of your life.

Christopher’s Spring Water is located at the foot of Echo Mountain in the lush rain forest of the Coast Mountain Range of British Columbia. In addition to the myriad of wildlife that make this area home – from bears and eagles that forage for food during salmon spawning seasons – the area has also been given worldwide attention thanks to the world-renowned phenomenon known as the “Sasquatch”. This giant ape-like creature has attracted the attention of tourists from around the world, each trying to seek him out and “capture him” on film for years. So far, no concrete evidence has been found. But… who can know for sure?